Breaking Glass Ceilings Since 1848

SUMMARY:

In July of 1848, men and women gathered in upstate New York to proclaim that liberty was not a right of men only, but women also were born to these rights. But it would be 70+ years until activists saw the results. The news media made it very difficult for the women’s rights movement to advance because they favored their male readers and wrote specifically for a male audience. Activists would attempt to have their ideas published, but editors and writers mocked the movement in their journals and papers. Through this ridicule, the media restricted the role of women in society even more so, by suggesting their knowledge and abilities were limited and were therefore best left at home. These women decided to make their own press and publish their own journals in order to better spread their ideas.

The first magazine published solely for women was called Ladies Magazine. The magazine was the first of its kind, but was owned and published by a man, and carried a rather male-dominant tone throughout its writing. The magazine wrote in a way that further domesticated women and encouraged them to fulfill their most important duty, that was being a good wife.

Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony were two impressive women who drove a significant part of the women’s rights movement. Nearly their every move was criticized, but the women headed several impactful projects that produced really positive results for the movement. These results, however, weren’t seen until the Progressive Movement when other social issues were brought up for reform.

DISCUSSION QUESTIONS:

  • Who are some key women today who have spearheaded reform on women’s issues? What has she contributed?
  • Though we are way more progressive today in regards to women’s rights, why do women still face so much adversity? Perhaps especially in the workplace?
    • Maternity leave?

KEY TERMS/PEOPLE/EVENTS:

  • Seneca Falls
  • Mary Katherine Goddard (not as important as Elizabeth Cady Stanton or Susan B. Anthony, but still a cool woman who did a cool thing)
  • Ladies Magazine
  • Elizabeth Cady Stanton
  • The Declaration of Sentients
  • Susan B. Anthony
  • Lucy Stone
  • The Progressive Movement
  • Harriet Stanton Blatch

VISUAL:

screen shot 2019-01-30 at 5.17.47 pm

Front Page of The Revolution, January 15, 1868. 15 Jan. 1968. Wikimedia Commons. Wikimedia Commons. By Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony. https://www.commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:The_Revolution_vol_1_number_2.png.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s